Status Summary

First reading, referred to Human Services & Early Learning on 1.18.19. Public hearing scheduled in the House Committee on Human Services & Early Learning on 1.29.19 at 1:30 p.m. (subject to change) Executive action taken in the House Committee on Human Services & Early Learning on 2.1.19; 1st substitute bill passed. Referred to Appropriations on 2.5.19. Public hearing scheduled in the House Committee on Appropriations on 2.20.19 at 3:30 p.m. (updated 2.15.19)

Legislative Session

2019

Status

In Progress

Sponsor

Shewmake

In Washington, over 46,000 community and technical college (CTC) students, (23% of all CTC students in the state), are parents of dependent children. Student parents represent more than one-quarter of CTC students in Washington who receive financial aid. Financial assistance however, does not sufficiently cover many student parents' college expenses.  Caregiving demands affect student parents' ability to devote the time needed to succeed in school. Nearly 75% of women community college students living with dependents report spending over twenty hours per week caring for dependents. Many of these students report that care demands are likely to lead them to drop out or withdraw from college to care for dependents. In addition, child care costs represent a large financial burden for parents who are in college.

The bill removes restrictions on subsidized child care in an effort to improve access and completion for students at institutions of higher education, especially at community and technical colleges.

The bill revises any rules that require applicants or consumers who are full-time community or technical college students and who are not WorkFirst participants to work at least an average of twenty or more hours per week, or at least an average of sixteen hours or more per week in a federal or state work-study program, as a condition of receiving Working Connections Child Care program benefits. The rules applicable to full-time students enrolled in community or technical or tribal colleges must be revised to eliminate the work requirement as a condition of receiving Working Connections Child Care program benefits.