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Emancipation

A youth who is legally declared an adult (by a court) prior to age 18 is referred to as being emancipated. Emancipation determinations are rarely based on age alone, but typically require a showing of a minimum level of self-sufficiency. This should be distinguished from emancipation from out-of-home care, which occurs when a foster youth turns 18 and leaves the foster care system by "aging out."

http://www.cafosteringconnections.org/pdfs/fostercareprotocol.pdf

Emancipation

A youth who is legally declared an adult (by a court) prior to age 18 is referred to as being emancipated. Emancipation determinations are rarely based on age alone, but typically require a showing of a minimum level of self-sufficiency. This should be distinguished from emancipation from out-of-home care, which occurs when a foster youth turns 18 and leaves the foster care system by "aging out."

http://www.cafosteringconnections.org/pdfs/fostercareprotocol.pdf

Emergency Respite Center

Commonly known as a crisis nursery, an emergency respite centers  provides emergency and crisis care for up to 72 hours to children who have been admitted by their parents or guardians to prevent abuse or neglect. Emergency respite centers may operate for up to 24 hours a day, and for up to seven days a week. They may provide care for children ages birth through 17, and for persons 18 through 20 with developmental disabilities who are admitted with a sibling or siblings through age 17.

http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=74.15.020

Emergency Respite Center

Commonly known as a crisis nursery, an emergency respite centers  provides emergency and crisis care for up to 72 hours to children who have been admitted by their parents or guardians to prevent abuse or neglect. Emergency respite centers may operate for up to 24 hours a day, and for up to seven days a week. They may provide care for children ages birth through 17, and for persons 18 through 20 with developmental disabilities who are admitted with a sibling or siblings through age 17.

http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=74.15.020

Evidence Based Practice or Intervention (EBP/EBI)

An intervention, program, or tool with empirical research supporting its efficacy and effectiveness is referred to as an Evidence Based Practice or Intervention (EBP/EBI). Efficacy refers to how well an intervention works to bring about change in a targeted area when tested under carefully controlled conditions. How well an intervention works in a real-world setting defines the essence of its effectiveness. In September 2012, HB 2536 required the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), in consultation with the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) and the University of Washington Evidence-Based Practice Institute (EBPI) to publish descriptive definitions and prepare an inventory of Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs), research-based practices, and promising practices for the prevention and intervention services of children and juveniles in child welfare, juvenile justice, and mental health. Specifically, the bill requires that by June 2013, DSHS, in collaboration with the Health Care Authority, complete a baseline assessment of the utilization of evidence-based and research-based practices in the areas of child welfare, juvenile rehabilitation, and mental health. See HB 2536 for more details. See Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s searchable National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP).

http://www.ncsl.org/documents/cyf/strategies_reducing_the_number_of_children_in_foster_care.pdf
http://depts.washington.edu/ebpi/2536.php

Ex Parte

An action on behalf of or involving only one party to a legal matter and in the absence of and usually without notice to other parties is referred to as being ex parte. For example, an emergency removal of a child from an unsafe home situation may be done through an ex parte order.

http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/usermanuals/courts/courts.pdf

Extended Foster Care Program

In Washington State, the Extended Foster Care Program provides eligible youth ongoing placement and foster care services from age 18 to age 21 for those wishing to pursue their High School Diploma, General Equivalency Diploma, College Degree, or Vocational Certification. Eligible youth electing to participate in the program will: 1) remain in placement and receive foster care services; 2) have an open dependency, with an attorney assigned and court reviews every six months; and 3) receive monthly visits by a public child welfare worker and continued visitation with siblings. Eligible youth who do not elect to participate in the Extended Foster Care program on their 18th birthday will have six months from their 18th birthday to re-enter foster care to participate in the program.

Education and Training Voucher Program

A 2001 amendment to the federal John Chafee Independence Act known as the Education and Training Voucher Program authorized funding to states for the provision of financial assistance to youth who have aged out of foster care and are attending post-secondary institutions. Youth who are eligible for this program may receive assistance with their cost of attendance up to $5,000 per year. Youth who are enrolled in this program before age 21 years may continue to receive this service until age 23 provided they are making satisfactory progress towards the completion of their program.