Key Takeaway:
Pilot study testing the feasibility, usability, and outcomes of Connecting, an adaptation of Staying Connected with Your Teen (a low-cost, self-directed, family-based substance-use prevention program) with foster families shows promising results for this adapted program.

Author(s)

This study tests the feasibility, usability, and outcomes of Connecting, an adaptation of Staying Connected with Your Teen (a low-cost, self-directed, family-based substance-use prevention program) with foster families in a randomized, waitlist control pilot study. Families fostering teens between 11 and 15 years of age were recruited and randomly assigned into the self-administered program with telephone support from a family consultant or a waitlist control condition. Satisfaction with the program was high and program completion was good. Outcomes showed increased communication about sex and substance use in the intervention group. These teens also reported lower family conflict, and more family rules related to monitoring and media use. Overall, program participation appeared to lead to stronger family management, better communication around monitoring and media use, teen participation in setting family rules, and decreased teen attitudes favorable to antisocial behavior. This small pilot study shows promising results for this adapted program.

Citation

Haggerty, K. P., Barkan, S. E., Skinner, M., Packard, W. B., & Cole, J. J. (2016). Feasibility of Connecting, a substance-abuse prevention program for foster teens and their caregivers. Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research, 7(4), 639-659.