Key Takeaway:
This article describes lessons learned from two family-focused longitudinal prevention research studies of Latino immigrants in Oregon —the Adolescent Latino Acculturation Study (ALAS) and the Latino Youth and Family Empowerment Project-II (LYFE-II).

Development and testing of culturally relevant interventions requires the recruitment and retention of ethnic minorities for research studies. There is a particularly high interest in recent minority immigrants from Central and South America due to their widespread growth, and their needs and contributions to their new communities. This article describes lessons learned about recruiting and retaining minority immigrants in two longitudinal research studies of Latino immigrants in Oregon —the Adolescent Latino Acculturation Study (ALAS) and the Latino Youth and Family Empowerment Project-II (LYFE-II). Implications of Latino immigrants' social, legal, economic, and political contexts on strategies for effective recruitment and retention are explored.

Citation

Martinez, C. R., Jr., McClure, H. H., Eddy, J. M., Ruth, B., & Hyers, M. J. (2012). Recruitment and retention of Latino immigrant parents in prevention research. Prevention Science, 13(1), 15-26.