Key Takeaway

In the early 1990s, kinship care emerged as a child welfare model. This brief presents a model based on a "collaborative mode of practice" designed to work for the maximum benefit of children in kinship care.

In the early 1990s, kinship care emerged as a child welfare model. A model based on a "collaborative mode of practice" designed to work for the maximum benefit of children in kinship care is presented in this brief by POC guest contributors. The elements of the model include: nine major issues that require collaboration (e.g., legal status, health care, school); five caseworker competencies (e.g., respect for knowledge, skills, and experiences of others); four phases of kinship care service (ranging from assessing the kinship family for willingness to be a kin caregiver to transitioning the family to community-based supports); and three federally mandated outcomes for children (i.e., child safety, well-being, and permanency).

Citation

Pasztor, E. M., Petras, D. D., & Rainey, C. (2011). Collaborating with kinship caregivers: The practice choice and challenge of kinship care (From Evidence to Practice). Seattle, WA: University of Washington School of Social Work, Partners for Our Children.